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Duplex Sonography in Subclavian Steal Syndrome Treated by Stent Insertion
Korean J Clin Lab Sci 2018;50:370-374  
Published on September 30, 2018
Copyright © 2018 Korean Society for Clinical Laboratory Science.

Minho Han

Department of Neurology, Yonsei University Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: Minho Han
Department of Neurology, Yonsei University Severance Hospital, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, 03722 Seoul, Korea
Tel: 82-2-2228-5283
Fax: 82-2-2228-5283
E-mail: umsthol18@gmail.com
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Subclavian steal syndrome is a type of obstructive artery disease caused by severe stenosis and occlusion of a left proximal subclavian artery or brachiocephalic trunk. The resulting vertebro-basilar insufficiency symptoms are due to retrograde blood flow from the contralateral vertebral and basilar arteries into the low-pressure ipsilateral upper extremity vessels. For that reason, patients usually experience dizziness or arm ischemic symptoms. Neurointervention is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke, including the subclavian artery stenosis. This paper reports a patient with subclavian steal syndrome who had a vertebral artery Doppler waveform change in duplex sonography and a 12 mmHg difference in interarm systolic blood pressure. A stenotic lesion of the subclavian artery was treated effectively by inserting a precise stent. The follow up examination showed that the vertebral artery Doppler waveform change disappeared and recovered and that the 12 mmHg difference in interarm systolic blood pressure decreased to 5 mmHg after treatment.
Keywords : Duplex sonography, Interarm systolic blood pressure difference, Subclavian steal syndrome

September 2018, 50 (3)
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