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The Effect of Community-based Health Intervention Program to Improve Metabolic Disease in Jeju Island
Korean J Clin Lab Sci 2018;50:297-303  
Published on September 30, 2018
Copyright © 2018 Korean Society for Clinical Laboratory Science.

Woo Jin Kim1, Sang Hoon Kim2, Shin Young Park3

1Department of Laboratory Medicine, Cheju Halla General Hospital, Jeju, Korea
2Office of External Affairs, Cheju Halla General Hospital, Jeju, Korea
3Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Jeju Halla University, Jeju, Korea
Correspondence to: Shin Young Park
Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Jeju Halla University, 38 Halladaehak-ro, Jeju 63092, Korea
Tel: 82-64-741-7403
Fax: 82-64-747-3989
E-mail: shiny@chu.ac.kr
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
This study investigated the effect of community-based health intervention program to improve metabolic disease in Jeju island. There were 50 obese local residents in the experimental group (body mass index, BMI⪰25 kg/m2). They participated in cooking therapy with nutrition education (4 times), exercise program with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) and stretching training (9 times), and alternative medicine program with healing touch massage (3 times) during a 3-week period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the program, body composition, blood lipid profiles, blood glucose, and waist circumference were assessed before and after the intervention program. After the program, the value of total cholesterol (TC), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C), diastolic blood pressure, percent body fat, and waist circumference were decreased, and became the normal value. Especially, HbA1C, percent body fat, and waist circumference were significantly decreased (P<0.001) in the experimental group, while HbA1C, percent body fat, and waist circumference were significantly increased (P<0.001) in the control group (N=50), who had no intervention. Our results suggest that metabolic syndrome associated markers need intervention program for improving them. In conclusion, although this study did not analyze the effect of the health intervention program and cooking therapy separately, considering the result of this 3-week, short term program, the effect will be more profuse if cooking therapy and exercise program were performed concurrently.
Keywords : BMI, Community-based, Health program intervention, Metabolic disease, PNF

September 2018, 50 (3)
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